FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions
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Frequently Asked Questions

What is a radon mitigation system?


A radon mitigation system is any system or steps designed to reduce radon

concentrations in the indoor air of a building.


The EPA recommends that you take action to reduce your home's indoor radon

levels if your radon test result is 4 pCi/L or higher.

What are the benefits of radon mitigation?


The primary benefit is reducing the risk of developing lung cancer.

Standard radon reduction systems are usually effective within 24 hours and

maintain low levels as long as the fan is operating. Another potential

benefit of these systems is reduced infiltration of moist soil air with the

radon, which may reduce the humidity level in the basement of the home.

Homeowners should consider correcting a radon problem before making final

preparations to sell a home. This often provides more time to address the

problem and find the most cost-effective solution. In addition, the

current occupants--not just the buyer's occupants--will reap the benefit of

reduced risk.


What can be done to reduce radon in a home?


Your house type will affect the kind of radon reduction system that will

work best. Houses are generally categorized according to their foundation

design. For example: basement, slab-on-grade (concrete poured at ground

level), or crawlspace (a shallow unfinished space under the first floor).

Some houses have more than one foundation design feature. For instance, it

is common to have a basement under part of the house and to have a

slab-on-grade or crawlspace under the rest of the house. In these

situations a combination of radon reduction techniques may be needed to

reduce radon levels to below 4 pCi/L.


There are several methods that a contractor can use to lower radon levels

in your home. Some techniques prevent radon from entering your home while

others reduce radon levels after it has entered. the EPA generally

recommends methods that prevent the entry of radon.


In many cases, simple systems using underground pipes and an exhaust fan

may be used to reduce radon. Such systems are called "sub-slab

depressurization," and do not require major changes to your home. These

systems remove radon gas from below the concrete floor and the foundation

before it can enter the home. Similar systems can also be installed in

houses with crawl spaces. Radon contractors use other methods that may also

work in your home. The right system depends on the design of your home and

other factors.


Sealing cracks and other openings in the floors and walls is a basic part

of most approaches to radon reduction. Sealing does two things, it limits

the flow of radon into your home and it reduces the loss of conditioned

air, thereby making other radon reduction techniques more effective and

cost-efficient. The EPA does not recommend the use of sealing alone to

reduce radon because, by itself, sealing has not been shown to lower radon

levels significantly or consistently. It is difficult to identify and

permanently seal the places where radon is entering. Normal settling of

your house opens new entry routes and reopens old ones.


Any information that you may have about the construction of your house

could help your contractor choose the best system. Your contractor will

perform a visual inspection of your house and design a system that is

suitable. If this inspection fails to provide enough information, the

contractor will need to perform diagnostic tests to help develop the best

radon reduction system for your home. Whether diagnostic tests are needed

is decided by details specific to your house, such as the foundation

design, what kind of material is under your house, and by the contractor's

experience with similar houses and similar radon test results.

How much does it cost to reduce radon in an existing home?


The cost of making repairs to reduce radon is influenced by the size and

design of your home and other factors. Most homes can be fixed for about

the same cost as other common home repairs, like painting or having a new

hot water heater installed. The average cost for a contractor to lower

radon levels in a home is about $1,200, although this can range from $800

to about $2,000. Your costs may vary depending on the size and design of

your home and which radon reduction methods are needed.

Who should I hire to correct a radon problem?


Lowering high radon levels requires technical knowledge and special skills.

You should use a contractor who is trained to fix radon problems.

What is a radon mitigation system?


A radon mitigation system is any system or steps designed to reduce radon

concentrations in the indoor air of a building.


The EPA recommends that you take action to reduce your home's indoor radon

levels if your radon test result is 4 pCi/L or higher.

What are the benefits of radon mitigation?


The primary benefit is reducing the risk of developing lung cancer.

Standard radon reduction systems are usually effective within 24 hours and

maintain low levels as long as the fan is operating. Another potential

benefit of these systems is reduced infiltration of moist soil air with the

radon, which may reduce the humidity level in the basement of the home.

Homeowners should consider correcting a radon problem before making final

preparations to sell a home. This often provides more time to address the

problem and find the most cost-effective solution. In addition, the

current occupants--not just the buyer's occupants--will reap the benefit of

reduced risk.


What can be done to reduce radon in a home?


Your house type will affect the kind of radon reduction system that will

work best. Houses are generally categorized according to their foundation

design. For example: basement, slab-on-grade (concrete poured at ground

level), or crawlspace (a shallow unfinished space under the first floor).

Some houses have more than one foundation design feature. For instance, it

is common to have a basement under part of the house and to have a

slab-on-grade or crawlspace under the rest of the house. In these

situations a combination of radon reduction techniques may be needed to

reduce radon levels to below 4 pCi/L.


There are several methods that a contractor can use to lower radon levels

in your home. Some techniques prevent radon from entering your home while

others reduce radon levels after it has entered. the EPA generally

recommends methods that prevent the entry of radon.


In many cases, simple systems using underground pipes and an exhaust fan

may be used to reduce radon. Such systems are called "sub-slab

depressurization," and do not require major changes to your home. These

systems remove radon gas from below the concrete floor and the foundation

before it can enter the home. Similar systems can also be installed in

houses with crawl spaces. Radon contractors use other methods that may also

work in your home. The right system depends on the design of your home and

other factors.


Sealing cracks and other openings in the floors and walls is a basic part

of most approaches to radon reduction. Sealing does two things, it limits

the flow of radon into your home and it reduces the loss of conditioned

air, thereby making other radon reduction techniques more effective and

cost-efficient. The EPA does not recommend the use of sealing alone to

reduce radon because, by itself, sealing has not been shown to lower radon

levels significantly or consistently. It is difficult to identify and

permanently seal the places where radon is entering. Normal settling of

your house opens new entry routes and reopens old ones.


Any information that you may have about the construction of your house

could help your contractor choose the best system. Your contractor will

perform a visual inspection of your house and design a system that is

suitable. If this inspection fails to provide enough information, the

contractor will need to perform diagnostic tests to help develop the best

radon reduction system for your home. Whether diagnostic tests are needed

is decided by details specific to your house, such as the foundation

design, what kind of material is under your house, and by the contractor's

experience with similar houses and similar radon test results.

How much does it cost to reduce radon in an existing home?


The cost of making repairs to reduce radon is influenced by the size and

design of your home and other factors. Most homes can be fixed for about

the same cost as other common home repairs, like painting or having a new

hot water heater installed. The average cost for a contractor to lower

radon levels in a home is about $1,200, although this can range from $800

to about $2,000. Your costs may vary depending on the size and design of

your home and which radon reduction methods are needed.

Who should I hire to correct a radon problem?


Lowering high radon levels requires technical knowledge and special skills.

You should use a contractor who is trained to fix radon problems.

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