Radon Mitigation

What is a radon mitigation system?Less

What is a radon mitigation system?

A radon mitigation system is any system or steps designed to reduce radon concentrations in the indoor air of a building.

A radon mitigation system is any system or steps designed to reduce radon concentrations in the indoor air of a building.

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The EPA recommends that you take action to reduce your home's indoor radon levels if your radon test result is 4 pCi/L or higher.

The EPA recommends that you take action to reduce your home's indoor radon levels if your radon test result is 4 pCi/L or higher.

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What are the benefits of radon mitigation? Less

What are the benefits of radon mitigation?

The primary benefit is reducing the risk of developing lung cancer.  Standard radon reduction systems are usually effective within 24 hours and maintain low levels as long as the fan is operating.  Another potential benefit of these systems is reduced infiltration of moist soil air with the radon, which may reduce the humidity level in the basement of the home.  Homeowners should consider correcting a radon problem before making final preparations to sell a home.  This often provides more time to address the problem and find the most cost-effective solution.  In addition, the current occupants--not just the buyer's occupants--will reap the benefit of reduced risk.

The primary benefit is reducing the risk of developing lung cancer.  Standard radon reduction systems are usually effective within 24 hours and maintain low levels as long as the fan is operating.  Another potential benefit of these systems is reduced infiltration of moist soil air with the radon, which may reduce the humidity level in the basement of the home.  Homeowners should consider correcting a radon problem before making final preparations to sell a home.  This often provides more time to address the problem and find the most cost-effective solution.  In addition, the current occupants--not just the buyer's occupants--will reap the benefit of reduced risk.

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What can be done to reduce radon in a home?Less

What can be done to reduce radon in a home?

Your house type will affect the kind of radon reduction system that will work best. Houses are generally categorized according to their foundation design. For example: basement, slab-on-grade (concrete poured at ground level), or crawlspace (a shallow unfinished space under the first floor). Some houses have more than one foundation design feature. For instance, it is common to have a basement under part of the house and to have a slab-on-grade or crawlspace under the rest of the house. In these situations a combination of radon reduction techniques may be needed to reduce radon levels to below 4 pCi/L.

Your house type will affect the kind of radon reduction system that will work best. Houses are generally categorized according to their foundation design. For example: basement, slab-on-grade (concrete poured at ground level), or crawlspace (a shallow unfinished space under the first floor). Some houses have more than one foundation design feature. For instance, it is common to have a basement under part of the house and to have a slab-on-grade or crawlspace under the rest of the house. In these situations a combination of radon reduction techniques may be needed to reduce radon levels to below 4 pCi/L.

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There are several methods that a contractor can use to lower radon levels in your home. Some techniques prevent radon from entering your home while others reduce radon levels after it has entered. the EPA generally recommends methods that prevent the entry of radon.

There are several methods that a contractor can use to lower radon levels in your home. Some techniques prevent radon from entering your home while others reduce radon levels after it has entered. the EPA generally recommends methods that prevent the entry of radon.

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In many cases, simple systems using underground pipes and an exhaust fan may be used to reduce radon. Such systems are called "sub-slab depressurization," and do not require major changes to your home. These systems remove radon gas from below the concrete floor and the foundation before it can enter the home. Similar systems can also be installed in houses with crawl spaces. Radon contractors use other methods that may also work in your home. The right system depends on the design of your home and other factors.

In many cases, simple systems using underground pipes and an exhaust fan may be used to reduce radon. Such systems are called "sub-slab depressurization," and do not require major changes to your home. These systems remove radon gas from below the concrete floor and the foundation before it can enter the home. Similar systems can also be installed in houses with crawl spaces. Radon contractors use other methods that may also work in your home. The right system depends on the design of your home and other factors.

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Sealing cracks and other openings in the floors and walls is a basic part of most approaches to radon reduction. Sealing does two things, it limits the flow of radon into your home and it reduces the loss of conditioned air, thereby making other radon reduction techniques more effective and cost-efficient. The EPA does not recommend the use of sealing alone to reduce radon because, by itself, sealing has not been shown to lower radon levels significantly or consistently. It is difficult to identify and permanently seal the places where radon is entering. Normal settling of your house opens new entry routes and reopens old ones.

Sealing cracks and other openings in the floors and walls is a basic part of most approaches to radon reduction. Sealing does two things, it limits the flow of radon into your home and it reduces the loss of conditioned air, thereby making other radon reduction techniques more effective and cost-efficient. The EPA does not recommend the use of sealing alone to reduce radon because, by itself, sealing has not been shown to lower radon levels significantly or consistently. It is difficult to identify and permanently seal the places where radon is entering. Normal settling of your house opens new entry routes and reopens old ones.

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Any information that you may have about the construction of your house could help your contractor choose the best system. Your contractor will perform a visual inspection of your house and design a system that is suitable. If this inspection fails to provide enough information, the contractor will need to perform diagnostic tests to help develop the best radon reduction system for your home. Whether diagnostic tests are needed is decided by details specific to your house, such as the foundation design, what kind of material is under your house, and by the contractor's experience with similar houses and similar radon test results.

Any information that you may have about the construction of your house could help your contractor choose the best system. Your contractor will perform a visual inspection of your house and design a system that is suitable. If this inspection fails to provide enough information, the contractor will need to perform diagnostic tests to help develop the best radon reduction system for your home. Whether diagnostic tests are needed is decided by details specific to your house, such as the foundation design, what kind of material is under your house, and by the contractor's experience with similar houses and similar radon test results.

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How much does it cost to reduce radon in an existing home? Less

How much does it cost to reduce radon in an existing home?

The cost of making repairs to reduce radon is influenced by the size and design of your home and other factors. Most homes can be fixed for about the same cost as other common home repairs, like painting or having a new hot water heater installed. The average cost for a contractor to lower radon levels in a home is about $1,200, although this can range from $800 to about $2,000. Your costs may vary depending on the size and design of your home and which radon reduction methods are needed.

The cost of making repairs to reduce radon is influenced by the size and design of your home and other factors. Most homes can be fixed for about the same cost as other common home repairs, like painting or having a new hot water heater installed. The average cost for a contractor to lower radon levels in a home is about $1,200, although this can range from $800 to about $2,000. Your costs may vary depending on the size and design of your home and which radon reduction methods are needed.

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Who should I hire to correct a radon problem? Less

Who should I hire to correct a radon problem?

Lowering high radon levels requires technical knowledge and special skills. You should use a contractor who is trained to fix radon problems.

Lowering high radon levels requires technical knowledge and special skills. You should use a contractor who is trained to fix radon problems.

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Sump Pit Radon System Less

Sump Pit Radon System

Typical Price Range $750.00 to $850.00

Typical Price Range $750.00 to $850.00

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 Homes with a sump pump usually provide for a more simplified installation. Our crews will replace your current sump pump cap with a specially designed cap that allows for radon system integration. Because each home is unique, the system ventilation route is determined by access. Our goal is to provide the most aesthetically pleasing installation possible. While this method calls for additional parts, this is typically the most cost-effective installation for homes with sump pump access. 

 Homes with a sump pump usually provide for a more simplified installation. Our crews will replace your current sump pump cap with a specially designed cap that allows for radon system integration. Because each home is unique, the system ventilation route is determined by access. Our goal is to provide the most aesthetically pleasing installation possible. While this method calls for additional parts, this is typically the most cost-effective installation for homes with sump pump access. 

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Sub-Slab Depressurization System Less

Sub-Slab Depressurization System

Typical Price Range $950.00 to $1200.00

Typical Price Range $950.00 to $1200.00

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The installation of this radon mitigation system requires our specialist to drill a 5-inch hole through the concrete foundation. We then carefully excavate 10-15 gallons of dirt, fill or gravel to create a suction pit under the slab. Some homes require additional suction points to properly mitigate radon. Multiple suction points are typically found when the following conditions exist:

Lack of sub-slab communication” (the ability to remove air from beneath your entire slab) are:

The installation of this radon mitigation system requires our specialist to drill a 5-inch hole through the concrete foundation. We then carefully excavate 10-15 gallons of dirt, fill or gravel to create a suction pit under the slab. Some homes require additional suction points to properly mitigate radon. Multiple suction points are typically found when the following conditions exist:

Lack of sub-slab communication” (the ability to remove air from beneath your entire slab) are:

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  • Tight/compact sub-slab aggregate. This could be tightly packed clay or dirt.

  • Saturated soils beneath the slab. Naturally, wet dirt doesn’t provide good airflow.

  • Tight/compact sub-slab aggregate. This could be tightly packed clay or dirt.

  • Saturated soils beneath the slab. Naturally, wet dirt doesn’t provide good airflow.

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  • Foundation walls.  In newer construction, it is common for a home’s center beam to rest on a series of posts. These posts in turn rest on either concrete pads, or a full footer.  If there’s a footer beneath your slab in the center of your home, we cannot suck air through it!  We’ll need to install another suction point on the other side of the slab, so we’re drawing air from both sides of the hidden foundation.

  • Very large homes.  Usually, a single suction point will only work effectively on a slab that is under 2000sf

  • Because each home is unique, the system ventilation route is determined by access. Our goal is to provide the most aesthetically pleasing installation possible. The cost range of this system for a single suction point is typically in the range of $759.99 to $959.99 Other factors such as fan requirement, exit options, additional suction points, or extensive routing will have an effect on the total price.  

  • Foundation walls.  In newer construction, it is common for a home’s center beam to rest on a series of posts. These posts in turn rest on either concrete pads, or a full footer.  If there’s a footer beneath your slab in the center of your home, we cannot suck air through it!  We’ll need to install another suction point on the other side of the slab, so we’re drawing air from both sides of the hidden foundation.

  • Very large homes.  Usually, a single suction point will only work effectively on a slab that is under 2000sf

  • Because each home is unique, the system ventilation route is determined by access. Our goal is to provide the most aesthetically pleasing installation possible. The cost range of this system for a single suction point is typically in the range of $759.99 to $959.99 Other factors such as fan requirement, exit options, additional suction points, or extensive routing will have an effect on the total price.  

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Vapor Barrier Radon System Less

Vapor Barrier Radon System

To many variables for range

To many variables for range

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Do it right the first time! Our company has elected not to install passive only systems within crawlspaces and as such our only offering is the full package at an unbelievable rate. Our crews install and seal the vapor barrier to the foundation walls creating an airtight membrane. The radon mitigation system is then tied directly to the soil under the membrane. The system creates a constant vacuum that constantly pulls the radon out to vent above the roof of the house. This is the most expensive radon system, requiring the most labor and additional materials.

Do it right the first time! Our company has elected not to install passive only systems within crawlspaces and as such our only offering is the full package at an unbelievable rate. Our crews install and seal the vapor barrier to the foundation walls creating an airtight membrane. The radon mitigation system is then tied directly to the soil under the membrane. The system creates a constant vacuum that constantly pulls the radon out to vent above the roof of the house. This is the most expensive radon system, requiring the most labor and additional materials.

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